Apr
28
Sat
Race, Racism, and Emancipation: Can We See Ourselves As We Are? (The 2018 Solange Skinner Conference) @ Wilson Chapel
Apr 28 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Race, Racism, and Emancipation

Can We See Ourselves As We Are?

On the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation in America, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his fifteen-year-old nephew, his namesake. Published in 1962 as “My Dungeon Shook,” his letter touched on family history and characteristics, and also spoke of the destructive and deadening effect of being born in a ghetto, “into a society which spelled out with brutal clarity, and in as many ways as possible, that you were a worthless human being.” He cautioned young James not to believe what white people said about him, and to know from whence he came so as not to limit where he could go.

Baldwin stated that the real crime of his countrymen was their innocence. He advised, “The really terrible thing, old buddy, is that you must accept them. And I mean that very seriously. You must accept them with love. For these innocent people have no other hope. They are, in effect, still trapped in a history which they do not understand; and until they understand it, they cannot be released from it.” More than any other writer, Baldwin offered white people a view of themselves through the eyes of an African-American.

James Baldwin was an essayist, playwright and novelist who saw his mission as bearing “witness to the truth” about issues that are fundamental to the individual (and psychoanalysis), as well as to the structures and institutions that constitute our society. He wrote unflinchingly about life in Harlem, the racial situation in America, religion and spirituality, interracial relationships, sexuality, and humanity. He knew that his nephew’s identity was developing in the context of his family’s love and his country’s inhumanity.

The issues that Baldwin confronted remain as relevant today as they were 56 years ago when he wrote “My Dungeon Shook.” We have invited our panelists to respond to the ideas and challenges that Baldwin put forth in this short essay, and to add their own thoughts to begin our conversation on Race, Racism, and Emancipation in the current moment for the individual, for society, and for psychoanalysis.

Click here to register for this program.

Speakers

Adrienne E. Harris, MD (Panelist) is a Faculty Member and Clinical Consultant of the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy, a Faculty Member and Supervisor at the Psychoanalytic Institute of Norther California, and a Training Analyst in the IPA. She is co-chair of the Sandor Ferenczi Center at the New School in New York, the American Psychoanalytic Association’s Helen Meyers Visiting Scholar (on Women’s Issues) for 2018, the author of numerous psychoanalytic journal articles, and author or editor of many books, including Demons in the Consulting Room: Echoes of Genocide, Slavery and Extreme Trauma in Psychoanalytic Practice (co-edited with M. Kalb and S. Klebanoff, Routledge, 2016). She has a private practice in New York, NY.

Beverly J. Stoute, MD (Panelist) is a graduate of the New York Psychoanalytic Institute, a Training and Supervising Analyst at the Emory University Psychoanalytic Institute, and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Stoute was the 2016-2017 recipient of a Diversity Grant from the American Psychoanalytic Association, and co-editor of the Special Topics Section of The American Psychoanalyst (March 2017), entitled Conversations on Psychoanalysis and Race. Dr. Stoute is currently working on a co-edited book with Michael Slevin entitled Race in the Therapeutic Encounter. She has a private practice in Atlanta, Georgia.

Forrest Hamer, PhD (Panelist) is a Faculty Member of the San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis (SFCP), and is a Clinical Supervisor in the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program and in the California College of the Arts Counseling Service. He is the author of three books of poetry, titled Call and Response (1995), Middle Ear (2000), and Rift (2007). At SFCP he taught about Race and Culture in a Psychoanalytic Context, and he is the author of several psychoanalytic journal articles focused on the arts, race, and listening. He has a private practice in Oakland, CA.

Bernard Edelstein, MD (Moderator) is a Training and Supervising Analyst, and Past President at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute; Assistant Professor Part Time, Harvard Medical School and has a private practice in Cambridge, MA.

Click here to register for this program.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:

  1. Address the role of “otherness” in transference and counter-transference between patients and therapists from different racial and class backgrounds.
  2. Identify social conditions that cause practitioners to recoil from imagining the lives of patients from impoverished or violent backgrounds, and discuss ways to engage with the emotional consequences of societal realities.
  3. Utilize counter-transference to identify the practitioner’s own prejudices.
  4. Identify the role of prejudice in evaluating suitability for treatment in ways that are exclusionary or stereotyping, and compare with conscious attempts of the practitioner to engage with the patient’s social realities, bear painful affects, and remain sensitive to defenses in the service of the treatment.

 

References

Altman, Neil (2009) The Analyst in the Inner City: Race, Class and Culture through a Psychoanalytic Lens. Second Addition. Analytic Press: New York, NY.
Davids, M.F. (2011) Internal Racism: A Psychoanalytic Approach to Race and Difference. Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, U.K.
Harris, A (2012) The House of Difference, or White Silence. Studies in Gender and Sexuality, 13(3): 197-216.
Sue, D. W. (2010) Microaggressions in Everyday Life: Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation. Wiley: Hoboken, NJ.

 

Schedule
9:00am – 9:10am: Welcome and Announcements; 9:10am – 9:30am: Moderator’s Introduction and reading of My Dungeon Shook; 9:30am – 9:50am: Panelist #1 Presentation; 9:50am – 10:10am: Panelist #2 Presentation; 10:10am – 10:25am: Break; 10:25am – 10:45am: Panelist #3 Presentation; 10:45am – 12:00pm: Panelists Interactive Dialogue, and Discussion between Panelists and Audience.

Click here to register for this program.

This program is made possible by the generous support of BPSI Members and friends.
Your gift to BPSI helps us continue offering educational programming.  
To support BPSI, please visit www.bpsi.org.

 

FEE: $55 Early Bird (use code: EB2018SKN); $65 Regular (after 04/14/2018)
The fee is waived for and Early Career Clinicians, Students, and BPSI Members, Trainees, and Associates. Scholarships available upon request.
Space is limited. Registration in advance is required. Questions?: 617-266-0953.

This program will be of interest to the general public, graduate students in the areas of psychology, social work, and the humanities, and mental health clinicians at all levels of training.
Continuing Education credits are offered for psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and licensed mental health clinicians.
Continuing Education
Physicians: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Psychologists: The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This program fulfills the requirements for 3 hours of CE.

Please note: Per APA requirements, psychologists must attend 100% of a course in order to be eligible for continuing education credit.
Social Workers: Application for social work continuing education credits has been submitted. Please contact us at office@bpsi.org or 617-266-0953 for the status of social work CE accreditation.
Please note: Per NASW requirements, social works must attend 80% of a course in order to be eligible for continuing education credit.

The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6913. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. This program offers 2.5 NBCC Clock Hours.

Event Cancellation Policies & Procedures
Any program participant requesting their individual program registration be canceled, must submit their request in writing via email to Drew Brydon at dbrydon@bpsi.org. For fee-based events, a request for cancellation (and refund using the original form of payment) must be received no later than 48 hours in advance of the event. Requests received later than 48 hours prior to the event will not be processed or accepted. All approved refunds are subject to a $10.00 administrative fee. If BPSI cancels and event, all registrants will receive a full refund of fees paid (no administration charge) no later than two business days following the scheduled date of the event, using the original form of payment.

Grievance Policy
Please address any questions or concerns about your experience at this or any program or event you have attended at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute to the Program Chair, via the Senior Administrator/Continuing Education Administrator, BPSI, 141 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459; office@bpsi.org; 617.266.0953.

The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, Inc., 141 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459, does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, age, sexual orientation, national origin or handicap in the admissions, administration of its educational programs, scholarship programs or employment.

Oct
15
Mon
RESCHEDULED: A Beholder’s Share: The Pleasures and Perils of Imagination with Dodi Goldman, PhD @ BPSI
Oct 15 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

 

 

 

A Beholder’s Share: The Pleasures and Perils of Imagination

A secularly educated woman with no history of mental illness claims to have deeply meaningful experiences of “feeling God’s presence.” How might we understand her experience? Can we even describe it without foisting beliefs upon it?

In this talk, Dodi Goldman presents a sample of psychoanalytic work to ask: What happens when there are serious clashes of belief between patient and analyst? Exploring the pleasures and perils of imagination, he suggests that reality and imagination, though usually thought of as opposites, make necessary, if uneasy, bedfellows. Building on Winnicott’s view of psyche as “arising out of the imaginative elaboration of body functioning,” he wonders if our sense of reality might be evoked in the unpredictable space between imagination and adaptation. While fantasy creates versions of what is already known, imagination allows what seems familiar to be seen afresh.

 

Registration information will be forthcoming.

 

Speakers

Dodi Goldman, PhD (Presenter) is a Training and Supervising Analyst at the William Alanson White Institute and former Book Review Editor of Contemporary Psychoanalysis. He is the author of In Search of the Real: The Origins and Originality of D.W. Winnicott. His most recent collection of essays, A Beholder’s Share was published last year by Routledge. Dodi has a private practice in Manhattan and Great Neck, New York.

Karen Melikian, PhD (Moderator) is on the Faculty of the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute and the Armenian Psychological Association.  She is a supervising social worker at the McLean Hospital Children’s Programs and the 2017 recipient of the Arthur R. Kravitz Award for Community Action and Humanitarian Contributions.

 

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:

  1. Review the place of imagination in psychoanalytic theory.
  2. Discuss the complex relationship between apperception, perception and imagination.
  3. Explain the difference between fantasy and imagination.
  4. Apply two approaches to dealing with clashes of belief between clinician and patient in psychoanalytic treatment.

 

References

Goldman, D. (2017). A Beholder’s Share: Essays on Winnicott and the Psychoanalytic Imagination. New York: Routledge. [Available upon request from the library.]
Kandel, E. (2012). The Age of Insight: The quest to understand the unconscious in art, mind and brain. New York: Random House.
Abram, J. (ed.) (2013). Donald Winnicott Today. New York, Routledge. [Available upon request from the library.]
Ogden, B. & Ogden, T. (2013). The Analyst’s Ear and the Critic’s Eye: Rethinking psychoanalysis and literature. New York: Routledge. [Available upon request from the library.]

 

Schedule
8:00pm-8:10pm: Welcome and Introductions; 8:10pm-9:00pm: Paper presentation by Dodi Goldman; 9:00pm – 9:30pm: Audience Q&A and Discussion moderated by Karen Melikian.

 

This program is made possible by the generous support of BPSI Members and friends.
Your gift to BPSI helps us continue offering educational programming.  
To support BPSI, please visit www.bpsi.org.

 

This program will be of interest to the general public, graduate students in the areas of psychology, social work, and the humanities, and mental health clinicians at all levels of training.
Continuing Education
Information about Continuing Education credits will be posted as that information becomes available.

Event Cancellation Policies & Procedures
Any program participant requesting their individual program registration be canceled, must submit their request in writing via email to Drew Brydon at dbrydon@bpsi.org. For fee-based events, a request for cancellation (and refund using the original form of payment) must be received no later than 48 hours in advance of the event. Requests received later than 48 hours prior to the event will not be processed or accepted. All approved refunds are subject to a $10.00 administrative fee. If BPSI cancels and event, all registrants will receive a full refund of fees paid (no administration charge) no later than two business days following the scheduled date of the event, using the original form of payment.

Grievance Policy
Please address any questions or concerns about your experience at this or any program or event you have attended at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute to the Program Chair, via the Senior Administrator/Continuing Education Administrator, BPSI, 141 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459; office@bpsi.org; 617.266.0953.

The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, Inc., 141 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459, does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, age, sexual orientation, national origin or handicap in the admissions, administration of its educational programs, scholarship programs or employment.